2014-12-19

Dec. 19. Which medal is which?


Lieutenant Philip Neame of the Royal Engineers won the Victoria Cross on this day in 1914 at Neuve Chapelle. In the face of very heavy fire, he engaged the Germans in a single-handed bombing attack. He was able to check the enemy advance for enough time "to rescue all the wounded men whom it was possible to move" (source: The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 29074. p. 1700. 16 February 1916). It is possible the bombs he used were the Engineers' own design of empty jam tins filled with loose metal. His medal ribbons provide a wonderful test of identification. For example, during the First World War, Neame won further awards: getting Mentioned in Dispatches (MiD, four times - the oak leaf spray on his Victory medal ribbon) and receiving the Distinguished Service Order; he was honoured by the French government with the Legion d'honneur (Croix de Chevalier) and the Croix de guerre, as well as the Belgian Croix de guerre. The Museum of Liverpool has an online interactive guide to many of these medals and their ribbons.
Philip Neame's Medal Ribbons
Neame's battledress from later in his career has been shared on Europeana 1914-1918 (with a license of CC-BY-SA) by the Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive. He had a similarly adventurous Second World War, and - according to Wikipedia - Neame remains the only Victoria Cross recipient who has won an Olympic Gold Medal (Paris 1924, for shooting). Lieutenant General Sir Philip Neame's VC and his other medals are at the Imperial War Museum, London.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas. 

2014-12-18

Dec. 18. For Christmas: send a cheese (if not too heavy)

Carlo Barbieri, painter and soldier
In December 1915 Carlo Barbieri writes to his parents about his efforts to secure a suitable position in the military so he should not be called-up for service at the front. He apologises because he will not be home for Christmas - but perhaps they could send him a cheese? ["...un formaggio (che non so se si potrebbe) fino a non oltrepassare / il peso, ne avrei piacere"]. He had taught at l'Istituto di Belle Arti di Urbino before the War, and his grandchildren including Charles Inzerillo have contributed to Europeana 1914-1918 some of his paintings, a charcoal drawing of Barbieri by another artist and some photos, as well as a few of his letters - which have been transcribed. These have been shared under a license CC-BY-SA. Unable to avoid his call-up Carlo served as a machine-gunner (possibly with 9a Compagnia di Complemento del 33 Fanteria). His letters say little more of his misfortune, and concentrate on other matters - probably for the sake of his parents. In 1917 he contracted TB in the appalling conditions at the front. He was evacuated to l'Ospedale Militare di Bologna but appears to have been abandoned without attentive care, as his condition was incurable. His parents had to travel to Bologna to rescue him, and Carlo died at their home. He was 26 years old. Carlo Barbieri's artistic potential was never achieved and most of his works have been lost, save these few being shared online.


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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-17

Dec. 17. A Christmas letter

Shared by Helge Hemme under a CC BY-SA licence
This Christmas letter was sent by Oswin Arthur Ellrich to his three daughters in Paunsdorf, near Leipzigin in 1915. Only two months later, he was killed in Douaumont, France.

This is only one of many similar stories about loved ones who are lost. To read the letter (in German), go to http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/2589. This story was shared by Helge Hemme who has also made other stories and pictures related to Oswin Arthur Ellrich available.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-16

Dec. 16. 1914: Raid on Scarborough, Hartlepool and Whitby

On this day in 1914, the German navy attacked the British seaport towns of Scarborough, Hartlepool, West Hartlepool, and Whitby (pictured).
Whitby Abbey after the German naval bombardment of December 1914
This item is from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive, University of Oxford © The Imperial War MuseumWikipedia summarizes the events, and the subsequent ammunition for recruiters and propaganda writers, about this attack on civilians - like this poster (from Wikimedia):
British recruiting poster picturing damage from German naval artillery to a civilian house
This outrage resulted in over 100 deaths and nearly 600 wounded, and was in violation of the 1907 Hague Convention which prohibited naval bombardments of undefended towns without warning. Europeana 1914-1918 would love to discover stories from either side of this engagement, or the further attacks on British ports in 1916. The excellent Daily Telegraph series Inside the First World War includes War letters home: I never want to see such a thing again, "When war came to Britain on a cold winter's night, the nation found itself unprepared... one letter home from a VAD nurse glimpses at the shockwave that rippled in the aftermath of attack". Indeed, again from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive you can read how Vera Brittain, a VAD nurse based in Buxton in the north of England, reacted to reports in The Times newspaper, writing in her diary for that week, for example: "...The [Times] writer thinks that [the Germans] would not attempt to land troops because the difficulty of escape would be so much greater..."


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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-15

Dec. 15. A Christmas gift for 50 years

Image licensed as CC BY-SA by Dr Anthony D Barber
"... for over 50 years I sent him £1 every year to drink my health".
Those are the words of Lieutenant Vince, rendered in a newspaper article published on his 100th birthday. The recipient of the £1 was Walter James Barber, and he was also given a silver cigarette case with an inscription. It was this inscription that helped Walter's grandson trace the relatives of Lt Vince and learn more about the story behind the case and the annual Christmas gift of one pound.
In April 1918, Walter, Lt Vince and three others spent four days and four nights together retreating from the Ypres salient under what must surely have been horrendous circumstances. It is believed that it was Walter's good sense of direction that helped them find their way to safety. That the others were grateful can be assumed. An annual Christmas gift, given for over 50 years, bears witness of that.

To read the whole story, shared by Dr Anthony D Barber, please go to http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/3980.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-14

Dec 14. Christmas and birthday greetings

This card is one of several sent to Andreas Schuppe around Christmas and New Year 1914. Schuppe had sold his farm to be able to live a carefree life with his young wife, but not being tied to the land, he was drafted and sent to war in 1914. As he was born on the 31 December, he not only received Christmas cards but also a number of birthday greetings at around the same time. Some of these are transcribed and shared by Bodo A. W. Müller under a CC BY-SA licence. To see them and read the original story (in German) go to http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/2455.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.
Bodo A. W. Müller
Andreas Schuppe

2014-12-13

Dec 13. With a sad heart - five Christmases apart

Five Christmases in a row did Georg Holub's sister send a Christmas card to her brother at the front. On the 13th of December 1917 she writes: "Dearest Georg, with a sad heart I write a few lines again. Still no post from you. ... I yearn for a few lines from you".

The five Christmas cards and other documents relating to Georg Holub were shared by Karl Tröstl under a CC-BY-SA licence. From the collection we can not only gather that Georg Holub survived the war but we can also learn more about him and his war service. To see all the documents relating to Georg, go to the Europeana 1914-1918 site.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.
Karl Tröstl
Georg Holub
Georg Holub
Georg Holub

2014-12-12

Dec 12. On the frozen river Main

This picture shows a mother and her son on the frozen river Main in Frankfurt. The picture was taken some time in the winter 1916/1917. Although the scene may look idyllic with the skaters and the cathedral in the background, there is a sad note to it. The Schuster family had left their home for the perceived security in Frankfurt. However, life there was hard and many people died of disease, starvation and cold. Some time after the picture was taken, the family had to flee again to get away from the war.

This picture and story was shared by Franziska Bandur, the great-grand-daughter of the woman in the picture. It is made available under a CC BY-Sa licence. To read the original story (in German) and see one more picture, go to http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/6867.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.
Franziska Bandur
The Schuster familyThe Sch

2014-12-11

Dec. 11. Short trousers

When Private Alvin Whiteley was serving with "The Legion of Frontiersmen" (that's the 25th Batt. Royal Fusiliers) in Africa, he sent these fragments of cloth back home to his family in Yorkshire as Christmas greetings in 1916. They're cut from his trousers! He wrote an account of his time at Korogwe, at Maktau, and at Gaveta in German East Africa. The family has also transcribed his many letters, which runs to over 250 A4 pages.

This story was shared by James Burnett Hewitt, and is licensed as CC BY-SA.

To read the whole story and see pictures of Alvin and his family, go to http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/search?q=Alvin+Whiteley.


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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-10

Dec. 10. Walking in a winter wonderland

Winter on the Eastern Front, 1916
I've just finished reading a book about winter warfare tactics by our colleague from Lancashire Museums, Stephen Bull, and was pleased to discover this photo among the 350 photos taken by Max Jacoby during the First World War. He was a Jewish doctor from Pollnow, a small town in Pomerania who served as a member of the German Medical Corps and was stationed on the Eastern front in 1916-1918. He adds descriptions to most of his photos, many of which are from Darovo and Baranovichi Belarus. The albums have been passed through the family - Max died in the 1930s, he committed suicide to escape persecution by the Nazis. They have been shared on Europeana 1914-1918 in memory of Max, and because of the interesting and diverse contents.

This story was shared by Bob Hammon, and is licensed as CC BY-SA. To read the whole story, go to http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/search?q=Max+Jacoby.

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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-09

Dec. 9. The Feasting Party - Salonika

"We all tried to look as though we'd drank not wisely but too much"
From a collection relating to William Waterworth from Preston who served with the British army on the Macedonian Front in Salonika, during the Great War. William is seated (centre) holding the bottle, Christmas 1917. On the back of this photo of his motley crew, (the title and the caption are his), William has scribbled in pencil "Rotten Attempt!". It is just one of many fascinating contributions to Europeana 1914-1918 from across the European powers fighting there in Greece of letters, postcards, and candid photographs from a front which is relatively forgotten.

This story was shared by Terry Casey, and is licensed as CC BY-SA.

To read the whole story and see pictures of William and his friends, go to http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/3231.


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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-08

Dec. 8. Wartime Christmas 1917


"Being at war for over three years has left clear traces in the soldiers' faces"
This comment is made by Rolf Kranz, who shares this picture of Josef Schnitzius (middle row, 2nd left) among his comrades at Christmas 1917.

To see the original posting (in German) go to http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/4181 . Shared by Rolf Kranz, licensed as CC BY-SA.
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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-07

Dec. 7. The grandfather he never knew


With only a few old photograph as a starting point, Dave Player researched the history of Andrew Neill, the grandfather he never knew. The story is presented as a Christmas present for the rest of his family.

Read the story and see more pictures at on the Europeana 1914-1918 site: http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/4270

Story and pictures contributed by Dave Player. Pictures licensed as CC BY-SA. 

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This post is part of our Advent Calendar. New stories are added every day.

2014-12-06

Dec 6. Hospital Christmas

Unknown people around a Christmas tree
Nothing is known about this photograph of eight men and a nurse by a Christmas tree. Who were they? Where were they? What happened to them? A picture may say more than a thousand words, but sometimes it would be useful to also have a few words.
The picture was contributed by W. Holscher, licensed as CC BY-SA, and you can see it at http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/2452


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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-05

Dec 5. A Christmas tragedy

Card sent from Eugene to Nellie
In December 1916, Eugene Marshall sent a Christmas card to his wife with the text: "from Gene in the trenches with love to Nellie." He was killed on December 21st, leaving behind not only a wife but also four daughters. When his fifth daughter was born in early 1917 she was named Eugenia after her father.

This story was shared by Ian Birchenough, and the pictures are licensed as CC BY-SA.

To read the whole story and see pictures of Eugene and Nellie, go to http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/3999.


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This post is part of our Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas.

2014-12-04

Dec. 4. Flowers from the front

Blumenstrauß aus dem Felde zu Weihnachten 1914 

For Christmas 1914, Ernst Hünnebeck sent a bouquet of flowers to his wife and children. He was deployed on the Balkan front in Montenegro, and perhaps he picked the flowers there himself. That the gift was treasured cannot be doubted as the the bouquet is still preserved, nearly a hundred years later.

Read the original post (in German) and see more pictures at on the Europeana 1914-1918 site:  http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/6629

Story and pictures contributed by Ekkehard Piclum, licensed as  CC BY-SA. 

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This post is part of our 2014 Advent Calendar. New stories are added every day.

2014-12-03

Dec 3. Easter card for Christmas

Easter card for Christmas

This card was sent to Mathilde Oeckermann in Gr. Mackenstedt for Christmas 1917. Presumably the sender could not get hold of a suitable seasonal card but 'adapted' one by crossing out the printed Easter greeting.

See the original contribution by W. Holscher at http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/4848, licensed as CC BY-SA.

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This post is part of our 2014 Advent calendar. New stories are published every day from Dec 1 until Christmas. 

2014-12-02

Dec 2. A Driver's War

James Mapeley, photo taken in 1916

"We managed to be fairly comfortable during Christmas and New Year 1915". The story about James Mapeley contains many interesting details about his experiences as a driver, working with horses, during the war. He sees three Christmases before he is sent home injured. Read more about James Mapeley on the Europeana 1914-1918 site. 

Story and related photographs were contributed by David Mapeley and are licensed as CC BY-SA http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/4884

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This post is part of our 2014 Advent calendar. More stories are shared every day.



2014-12-01

Dec 1. Made it home for Christmas

Image of Cpt Jo Morgans
Jo Morgans

Cpl Joseph Henry Morgans was wounded and left to die on the battlefield in December 1917. German surgeons saved his life and he spent the remainder of the war in a prisoner of war camp together with a large number of Russian prisoners. After the war, he walked to Denmark and eventually managed to return to his family in time for Christmas 1918.
Read more about Jo Morgans on the Europeana 1914-1918 site.

Story and pictures contributed by Kim Morgans, licensed as CC BY-SA http://europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/4891

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This post is part of our 2014 Advent Calendar. New stories are added every day.

2014-03-07

International Women’s Day


March 8th is International Women’s Day, an event that is celebrated in some parts of the World and virtually unknown in others. We would like to mark the occasion by pointing to a small sample of stories in the Europeana 1914-1918 collection. The format of the ‘stories’ varies – some are long, detailed, and richly illustrated while others are brief and may consist of only one image and a line or two of text. What they have in common though is that they all tell us something about women’s life during the time of the First World War. All the material is shared by members of the public who have added them to the archive either online or at a collection event. To see these stories, and many, many more, visit the http://europeana1914-1918.eu/ website.



Hulda Framers – grieving fiancée
This picture shows Hulda Framers. Around her neck is a chain on which she carries an engagement ring and an iron cross, presumably those of her fallen fiancée.
Hulda Framers

Shared by Andreas Bruehl under a CC BY-SA licence.  http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/12730

Maria Mohr. Lost so much.
Maria Mohr (nee Steiner) was born in Silesia in 1888. In 1911 she married the actor and director Ludwig Mohr from Bohemia and thus became a citizen of the Habsburg monarchy. Shortly after the birth and death of their son, Ludwig Mohr was drafted to the army. He was killed in Drenovac, Serbia in October 1914. Maria worked as a Red Cross nurse in the war hospital Grinzing, Vienna from 1916. 
Between May 1918 to September 1919 she managed a girl’s home for the Army with about 50-60 girls. She got engaged to an officer in 1918, but he died and was buried in Levico.
Maria returned to Silesia in 1919, after the war. Through her work in the hospital she had contracted
tuberculosis, and she spent some time in a clinic recovering. She then lived with her father, kept house for him and worked as an accountant. After the Second World War, when Silesia became Polish, Maria fled to Emsland to the family of her niece Elfriede, where she lived until her death in 1954.
Maria Mohr, Red Cross nurse

To read the whole story (in German) and see all the accompanying images and documents, go to the Europeana 1914-1918 site: http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/13965 Contributed by Erika Brieske CC BY-SA.

Women’s correspondence with secret codes
Sally McIntosh has shared a story relating to her great, great aunt.
Whilst the men were away fighting a number of my great, great aunt’s friends, who were all young women between 18 and 25 years of age, corresponded with one another by postcard, many of which show contemporary cartoons. They sent them for birthdays and to cheer one another up as well as to discuss every day life. The messages they wrote on the postcards were very basic and said very little, but I understand they developed a code to share messages, for example about news they had from soldiers overseas, or about other matters they did not want either the postman or the censor to see.
Card w cartoon
To read the whole story, and see more cards, go to http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/4317

2014-03-03

8,000 and counting

The Europeana 1914-1918 collection now has over 8,000 live stories, contributed by members of the public from across the world! All the stories and accompanying images can be explored for free at http://europeana1914-1918.eu.

Here is an extract from the 8001st story to go live:

Joseph Lee, No 50042/1023907 Dublin
By Peter Lee, http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/14008

Joseph Lee in Bangalore, India prior to WW1 
By Peter Lee  CC BY-SA
My Grandfather, Joseph Lee was born in Chapelizod, Co Dublin in 1886. Orphaned at a young age he served an apprenticeship as a shoeing smith with the Donnelly family of Portmarnock.
In March 1908, Joseph joined the Royal Field Artillery of the British Army. He served in India from 1909 until the outbreak of war in 1914, when as part of the 7th Meerut Division, Indian Expedition Force, he was sent to France/Flanders. Here, The 7th Meerut fought in the battles of La Bassee, Messines, Armentieres, Neuve Chapelle, Aubers Ridge, Festubert and Loos.
Then in the early 1916 Joseph and the 7th Meerut were sent to Mesopotamia.
(...)
To read the rest of the story and see what happend to Joseph, go to http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/14008.

 

2013-11-30

Advent 2013

In our 2013 Advent calendar we introduced stories and images from our collections, allowing you to simply enjoy these tasters or follow the links to read more and see the marvellous material that people are sharing in remembrance of those who lived, loved, fought, and took part in events during the First World War. With the return of spring, we have removed the advent calendar for now, but assure you there will be new stories and images to enjoy next Advent. While waiting for that, please feel free to explore the growing collection of stories and images that is available through the Europeana 1914-1918 site.

2013-10-23

Des tranchées, un père envoie des jouets à sa fille

Des tranchées, un père envoie des jouets à sa fille

Il ne fait aucun doute que pour Charles Grauss, soldat en garnison avec son régiment en France, la personne qui n’était jamais loin dans ses pensées était sa fille Ghislaine.

Durant son service comme second lieutenant du 339e puis du 286e régiment d’infanterie française, il sculpta et peint un nombre d’animaux de ferme miniatures avec lesquels sa petite fille pourrait jouer. L’ensemble, contenu dans une boîte en métal, comprenait un cochon, un âne, un lapin, un chien, une souris, un mouton, un canard et une poule. Grauss envoya également à Ghislaine une lettre touchante avec des illustrations comiques sur lesquelles ils étaient tous les deux représentés ; la magnifique maison qu’il voulait donner à sa mère et les baisers donnés à cette enfant qu’il aimait tant. Grauss fut tué lors d’une bataille le 29 avril 1918, à l’âge de 37 ans.

Les articles, accompagnés d’un carnet de dessins avec des ébauches, des aquarelles et des images de ses compatriotes soldats de différentes régions de France où il était stationné, ont été partagés par le mémorial de Verdun, un musée français consacré à la guerre 1914-1918.

Vous pouvez consulter les photos du Charles Grauss ici.

2013-02-14

Happy Valentine's Day

Edelweiss card
My Angel last night I received a letter from you. I learned how strong was the pain on the day we had to separate. Do you remember those beautiful kisses? Do you remember the last one we gave each other between the tears. You did not dare to say a word. The tears were suffocating you. While passing by you were at the window. The [train] guard also told me that. I didn't see you. I almost thought you didn't keep the promise made. I didn't dare to watch more than once. My poor heart was suffocated not by tears, but by a strong passion that I couldn't resist. You knew what my beliefs were. Also having to leave you again, what a pain... By the end of the year we hope this will end... Greetings and kisses Giuseppe. Enjoy this souvenir from me. In these rough mountains you can find these flowers.


This moving love letter was sent by Sergeant Major Giuseppe Castellani, to his wife Antonia at home in Fossato di Vico, while he was away serving in the Italian army during the First World War. All her life Antonia cherished this edelweiss card, which was contributed online to Europeana 1914-1918 by their grandson Manuel Castellani. You may also contribute your family's stories from the Great War, and soon we will be running family history roadshows in Italy including Trento 16 March 2013.

Reverse of Edelweiss card
Images: "Memory of our glorious Alps" sent 19 September 1917, and reverse

View the full story and the images here.

Words by Alun Edwards and Monica Rossi, University of Oxford

Felice giorno di San Valentino

Edelweiss card
Ho appreso quanto sia stato forte anche il dolore il di nuovo separarsi. Rammenti quei bei baci? Rammenti l’ultimo che ci demmo fra le lacrime. Non osati dire una minima parola. Ti soffocava il pianto. Nel passare stavi alla finestra. Me lo disse anche il guardiano. Io non ti viddi. Credevo quasi che non avevi mantenuto la promessa fattami. Non osai guardare più di una volta. Il mio povero cuore era soffocato non dal pianto,ma una forte passione che non potevo resistere. Te sai quali erano le mie convinzioni. Anche il doverti lasciare di nuovo come mi dispiacque. Speriamo che si possa ottenere cio che sappiamo,ma non sono tanto Affortunato. Qui si parla bene di pace. Entro quest’anno speriamo abbia fine. Ti darò presto una mia lettera. Saluti e baci Giuseppe Gradisci questo mio buon ricordo. Da queste scabrose montagne si trovano questi fiori.


Quando prestava servizio al fronte durante la Prima Guerra Mondiale, il Sergente Maggiore Giuseppe Castellani inviò questa commovente lettera d'amore alla moglie Antonia che attendeva il suo ritorno a Fossato di Vico (Perugia). Antonia ha conservato gelosamente queste preziose righe per tutta la vita e oggi, la cartolina, su cui appare una stella alpina - simbolo delle Alpi - è stata pubblicata sul sito Europeana 1914-1918 dal nipote Manuel Castellani. Anche tu puoi dare il tuo contributo al progetto Europeana 1914-1918 con oggetti e storie di famiglia risalenti alla Grande Guerra. Puoi utilizzare il sito http://europeana1914-1918.eu/it/ oppure presentarti ad uno dei collection days che stiamo organizzando in Italia, il primo sarà a Trento il 16 marzo 2013.

Reverse of Edelweiss card
Immagini: "Ricordo delle nostre Alpi gloriose": Ecco il testo della lettera d'amore sul retro della cartolina, inviata il 19 settembre 1917

Per vedere la storia e le immagini clicca qui.

Testo di Alun Edwards, Monica Rossi (University of Oxford), Federica Pellegatti (Fondazione Museo storico del Trentino)

2012-09-06

Καλύτερο έκθεμα στη συλλογή αντικειμένων Πρώτου Παγκοσμίου Πολέμου που διεξήχθη στη Σλοβενία

Καλύτερο έκθεμα στη συλλογή αντικειμένων Πρώτου Παγκοσμίου Πολέμου που διεξήχθη στη Σλοβενία

Την 23η Μαΐου 2012, η δημόσια Βιβλιοθήκη του Celje στη Σλοβενία φιλοξένησε το πρόγραμμα Europeana 1914-1918 το οποίο μέσα από τις συλλογές και παρουσιάσεις εκθεμάτων έφερε στις μνήμες μας τους τραυματισμούς από τον πρώτο παγκόσμιο πόλεμο καθώς επίσης την αποφασιστικότητα για μάχη μέσα από τις κακουχίες όσων βρίσκονταν μπροστά στο μέτωπο.

Χαρακτηριστικό, ήταν ένα προσθετικό άκρο (πόδι)με δυο διαφορετικές συνδέσεις στα κάτω άκρα που ανήκε στον Jakob Veber και το έφερε το μέλος της οικογένειας του Stanislav Veber. Το πόδι και τα δύο του άκρα φτιαγμένα από ξύλο, δέρμα και σιδερένια καρφιά είναι πολύ καλά διατηρημένα. Ο Jakob χρησιμοποιούσε το ολοκληρωμένο πόδι σε συνήθεις περιστάσεις και το απλό πόδι κατά τη διάρκεια της δουλειάς ή για εγχώρια χρήση.

Μαζί με το προσθετικό άκρο, ο Stanislav έφερε μαζί του και την ιστορία της οικογένειας του:

Ο Jakob Veber, γεννηθείς την 20η Ιανουαρίου 1888, μεγάλωσε σε μία φάρμα στην Galicija δίπλα από το Žalec με τους δύο αδερφούς του. Και οι τρείς νεαροί άντρες στρατολογήθηκαν από τις Σλοβενικές δυνάμεις κατά τη διάρκεια του πρώτου παγκοσμίου πολέμου και ο Jakob πήγε να πολεμήσει στο Ανατολικό μέτωπο στη Ρωσία. Το 1917 σε ηλικία 29 ετών, έχασε το δεξί του πόδι στο πεδίο της μάχης. Παρά το φρικιαστικό του τραυματισμό, ο Jakob παρέμεινε στο μέτωπο μέχρι το τέλος του πολέμουμε την βοήθεια του προσθετικού άκρου και των ψεύτικων κάτω άκρων. Όταν ο πόλεμος τελείωσε ο Jakob μπόρεσε να επιστρέψει σπίτι του.

Δυστυχώς δεν μπορεί να λεχθεί το ίδιο για τον αδερφό του Janez, ο οποίος σκοτώθηκε κατά τη διάρκεια του πολέμου, αφήνοντας πίσω του τη σύζυγο του Maria Veber και τα τρία παιδιά τους Franca, Angelo και Jožefo. Ακολούθως ο Jakob ένας τραυματισμένος βετεράνος πολέμου φρόντισε την κουνιάδα του και την οικογένεια της.

Ύστερα από χρόνια, ο Jakob και η Μαρία παντρεύτηκαν και έκαναν δύο δικά τους αγόρια, τον Vincent και τον Adolf. Η Μαρία πέθανε το 1936 σε ηλικία 47 ετών και όταν ξέσπασε πάλι πόλεμος και τα δύο αγόρια στρατολογήθηκαν στις στρατιωτικές δυνάμεις όπως ο πατέρας και θείος τους. Και οι δύο πολέμησαν κατά τη διάρκεια του δευτέρου παγκοσμίου πολέμου και ευτυχώς επιβίωσαν. Ο πατέρας τους Jakob πέθανε σε ηλικία 61 ετών στις 15 Μαρτίου 1949.

Το προσθετικό άκρο του Jakob είναι το πρώτο παράδειγμα προσθετικού ποδιού το οποίο καταχωρήθηκε στο πρόγραμμα μέχρι σήμερα. Μπορείτε να δείτε φωτογραφίες από τον στρατιώτη του πρώτου παγκοσμίου πολέμου Herman Peschel με προσθετικά χέριαεδώ.

Πατήστε εδώ για περισσότερες φωτογραφίες

2012-09-04

Σώθηκε από τη Βίβλο του – Μια οικογενειακή ιστορία

Image of the Bible pierced by shrapnel=
Η Βίβλος που έσωσε μια ζωή
Μια εκπληκτική οικογενειακή ιστορία καταχωρήθηκε στην ιστοσελίδα του Europeana 1914-1918 από τον καθηγητή Gottfried Geiler από το Leipzig. Το 1917 μια βίβλος έσωσε τη ζωή του στρατιώτη πατέρα του Kurt Geiler.

Κατά τη διάρκεια του ατελείωτου πολέμου των χαρακωμάτων Νοτιοανατολικά της Γαλλίας ο Kurt Geiler κοιμόταν όπως πάντα με την Βίβλο του κάτω από το κεφάλι του. Ξαφνικά, ένα απευθείας χτύπημα κατέστρεψε ολοσχερώς το καταφύγιο του με αποτέλεσμα να υπάρχουν παντού νεκροί και πληγωμένοι στρατιώτες. Ο Geiler χωρίς να τραυματιστεί κατάφερε να ξεφύγει από τα χαλάσματα. Αργότερα, βρήκε τη Βίβλο του στο έδαφος και προς έκπληξη του διαπίστωσε ότι μέσα στη Βίβλο υπήρχε σφηνωμένο ένα κέλυφος από εκρηκτικήοβίδα. Χωρίς τη Βίβλο αυτή η οβίδα θα του έλιωνε κυριολεκτικά το κεφάλι. Έκτοτε αυτή η Βίβλος αποτελεί ένα σημαντικό ενθύμιο για την οικογένεια.
(Text by Frank Drauschke)

2012-08-13

Kunstige fødder til hverdag og fest ved det slovenske roadshow

Best foot forward at Slovenia WW1 road show

Ved Europeana 1914-1918's roadshow i Celje, Slovenien d. 23. maj 2012, dukkede både smertefulde påmindelser om lidelserne i Første Verdenskrig op, men også beviser på, hvordan folk ved fronten kæmpede mod omstændighederne.

Stanislav Veber havde et kunstigt ben med, der oprindeligt tilhørte et familiemedlem; Jakob Veber. Det kunstige ben har to forskellige fødder, der kan sættes på, og er lavet af træ, læder og jernnitter. Det er overordentlig godt bevaret. Jakob Veber brugte den bedste fod – den hele fod – ved festlige lejligheder, og den simple træstump til arbejde og dagligdags begivenheder.

Stanislav Veber havde ikke kun det kunstige ben med, men også sin families historie.

Jakob Veber blev født d. 20. januar 1988 og voksede op på en gård i Galidja nær Žalec med sine to brødre. Alle tre blev de hvervet til den slovenske hær under Første Verdenskrig, og Jakob blev sendt til Østfronten i Rusland. I 1917, da han var 29 år gammel, mistede han benet i kamp. På trods af den forfærdelige skade blev han ved fronten krigen ud ved hjælp af et kunstigt ben og to kunstige fødder til det. Da krigen sluttede, kunne Jakob endelig vende hjem.

Det samme gjaldt desværre ikke hans bror, Janez, der faldt under krigen og efterlod sig en kone, Maria, og deres tre børn Franca, Angelo og Jožefo. Jakob, den sårede krigsveteran, endte med at tage sig af både svigerinde og børn.

Nogle år senere blev Jakob og Maria gift og fik to sønner; Vincent og Adolf. Skæbnen viste sig at blive lidt blandet for familien. Maria døde som 47-årig i 1936, og da der igen udbrød krig, blev begge sønner hvervet til de væbnede styrker – akkurat som deres far og onkler tidligere. Begge sønner kæmpede hele krigen og overlevede begge to. Jakob døde som 61-årig d. 15. marts 1949.

JJakobs ben er det eneste kunstige ben, Europeana 1914-1918 endnu har set. Du kan se den tyske Første Verdenskrigs-soldat, Herman Peschel, med kunstige arme her.

Klik her for flere billeder

2012-07-31

Mit dem besten Fuß - Der Aktionstag in Celje/Slowenien

Mit dem besten Fuß - Der Aktionstag in Celje/Slowenien

Am 23. Mai 2012 fand der Europeana 1914-1918 Aktionstag in der Stadtbibliothek von Celje, Slowenien statt. Ein Gegenstand tauchte auf, der sowohl an die Kriegsversehrten des Ersten Weltkrieges als auch an die Entschlossenheit diese Verletzungen der Soldaten an der Front zu behandeln und weiterzukämpfen erinnerte.

Dieser besondere Erinnerungsgegenstand war eine Beinprothese mit zwei unterschiedlichen Fußprothesen von Jakob Veber. Der Überbringer war Stanislav Veber, ein Familienmitglied. Das Bein und seine zwei Füße befinden sich in sehr gutem Zustand und bestehen aus Holz, Leder und Eisennieten. Für offizielle Anlässe benutzte Jakob den besten Fuß (d.h. vollständigen Fuß). Für zu Hause und für die Feldarbeit verwendete er den einfachen Fußstumpf.

Stanislav erzählte auch die Familiengeschichte, die hinter der Prothese steckt:

Jakob Veber, geboren am 20. Januar 1888, wuchs, gemeinsam mit seinen zwei Brüdern, auf einem Bauernhof in Glidja in der Nähe von Žalec auf. Die drei jungen Männer wurden während dem Ersten Weltkrieg in die Armee eingezogen. Jakob musste an der Ostfront in Russland kämpfen. 1917, im Alter von 29 Jahren, verlor er auf dem Schlachtfeld sein rechtes Bein. Trotz der schweren Verletzung blieb Jakob bis zum Ende des Krieges an der Front. Dies wurde ermöglicht durch eine Beinprothese und zwei künstliche Füße. Nach dem Krieg kehrte Jakob nach Hause zurück.

Dies traf tragischerweise nicht auf seinen Bruder, Janez, zu, der im Krieg gefallen ist. Er hinterließ seine Frau, Maria Veber, und die drei gemeinsamen Kinder Franca, Angelo und Jožefo. Jakob, der verletze Kriegsveteran, übernahm die Sorge um seine Schwägerin und ihre Familie.

Jahre später heirateten Jakob und Maria und bekamen zwei weitere Buben, Vincent und Adolf. Von da an wurde die Familie von wechselndem Glück begleitet. Maria starb 1936 mit 47 Jahren. Als erneut Krieg ausbrach wurden die beiden jüngeren Söhne, wie ihr Vater und ihre Onkel zuvor, zur Armee einberufen. Beide kämpften während des ganzen Zweiten Weltkrieges und überlebten glücklicherweise. Ihr Vater Jakob starb am 15. März 1949 im Alter von 61 Jahren.

Jakobs Prothese ist die erste Beinprothese, die bisher im Projekt beschrieben wurde. Fotos von deutschem Soldaten, Herman Peschel, mit seinen Armprothesen finden sichhier.

Klicken Sie hier für weitere Bilder

2012-07-27

Un grand pas en avant pour la journée d’action en Celje, Slovénie

Sreča v nesreči na dnevih zbiranja spominov v Sloveniji

Le 23 Mai 2012, la journée d’action Europeana 1914-1918 à la Bibliothèque de Celje fut le lieu de mémoire des méfaits de la Grande Guerre et de la détermination des soldats de lutter contre cette ignominie.

Stanislav Veber apporta une prothèse de jambe avec deux embouts différents pour pieds appartenant à Jakob Veber. La jambe artificielle et ses deux pieds en bois, cuir et rivets en fer fut très bien conservée. Jakob utilisa son « bon » pied pour des sorties plus formelles et le pied moins sophistiqué pour la vie de tous les jours.

Stanislav Veber partagea également son histoire de famille:

Jakob Veber fut né le 20 Janvier 1888 et grandit sur une ferme à Galicija près de Žalec avec ses deux frères. Les trois adolescents partirent à la guerre avec l’armée Slovène et Jakob combattit sur le Front Est en Russie. Il perdit sa jambe droite au champ de bataille en 1927, à l’âge de 29 ans. Malgré cet accident, Jakob resta sur le front et ne rentra qu’à la fin de la guerre.

Malheureusement, son frère, Janez, n’a pas eu autant de « chance » et fut tué sur le front. Son épouse et ses trois enfants demeurèrent sans époux ni père. Toutefois, Jakob pris soins d’eux.

Ce n’est que des années plus tard que Jakob et sa belle-sœur se marièrent et eurent des deux enfants, Vincent et Adolf. Commença une vie mouvementée : Maria mourut en 1936 à l’âge de 47 ans et la Seconde Guerre mondiale obligea les enfants d’entrer dans l’armée. Tous les deux survécurent.Leur père, Jakob, mourût à l’âge de 61 ans, le 15 mars 1949.

La prothèse de Jakob est le premier exemple de prothèse qu’Europeana 1914-1918 a collecté jusqu’à maintenant. Vous pouvez consulter les photos du soldat allemand, Hermann Peschel avec ses prothèses de bras ici.

Cliquez ici pour voir d’autres photos